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Thread: Pachinko Evolution

  1. #21
    Pachi Puro emmadog's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    this heiwa is further down the evolutionary line than the above machines but it's interesting because it has both a shooter knob and a lever. on the previous page there's a close up pic of that area and an extensive caption which of course, is in Japanese.
    2nd pic is of another pachinko history book i have that this heiwa was pictured in.
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    Last edited by emmadog; 04-20-2012 at 09:21 PM.
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  3. #22
    Pachi Puro emmadog's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    *Upper Jellyfish* It seemed like things had settled on their generally being a jellyfish underneath the heaven holes, but this was the last of such machines. This is due to the rapid renewal rate of yakumono; stimulating new yakumono were coming out within less than a month after this machine. (c. Showa 44, International)

    *Lower Tulip* Just as there are periods of popularity for yakumono, there are also fads for cell designs. At the time of this machine, abstract patterns were particularly numerous. The main colors used were red, blue and green. (Showa 44, New Gin)

    *Rotary* When the unmanned machines came out in Showa 35 they were a small minority compared to the mainstream of manned machines. This machine established Nishijin’s unmanned machine philosophy, or rather declared it. After this, unmanned machines reached a height of prosperity. (Showa 44, Nishijin)
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  5. #23
    Kungishi candyflip's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    Quote Originally Posted by emmadog View Post
    ...*Rotary* When the unmanned machines came out in Showa 35 they were a small minority compared to the mainstream of manned machines. This machine established Nishijin’s unmanned machine philosophy, or rather declared it. After this, unmanned machines reached a height of prosperity. (Showa 44, Nishijin)
    What does the translation mean 'unmanned'? Were there people manually cranking balls back to the machines originally, and so later on they were 'unmanned'?
    There is always another machine around the corner...

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    Pachi Puro emmadog's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    I wondered the same thing. Could be that the translation is not correct for whatever "unmanned" is.
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    Kungishi candyflip's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    Quote Originally Posted by emmadog View Post
    I wondered the same thing. Could be that the translation is not correct for whatever "unmanned" is.
    Probably - ask your translator!

    There is always another machine around the corner...

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    Pachi Puro emmadog's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    last little bit of translated material:
    “Pachinko seems to be thriving lately. It is said that a second golden age has arrived now in the biggest pachinko boom since ’28, and parlors compete with each other with ever larger and more deluxe facilities. They are planning ways to increase the customer base above and beyond their main customers of salarymen to include more female customers, using various methods including opening ‘Women’s Pachinko Tournaments.’”
    One section of the article titled “Pachinko’s Second Boom/New Machines Find Popularity/Also Women’s Corners” from the June 3rd Showa 41 evening issue of “Japan Economic News”had this to say.
    “When all is said and done, customers gather at parlors that give out lots of balls. With March’s relaxation of limitations, the focus of popularity has been on machines with devices called ‘yakumono,’ such as the ‘tulip’ device which has a flower open up and lets a second ball enter when one ball enters it, the ‘jellyfish,’ ‘beetle’ and others.”
    In Showa 41 the tulip arrived at long last, in the height of Japan’s period of rapid economic growth. Pachinko halls were rapidly modernized
    “On the 4th, the National Police Agency decided that while they would deny the request by the All Japan Game Industry Associative Union for an increase in value of pachinko balls, instead they would allow new automatic pachinko machines. The agency says that with these new machines the skill gap between pros and amateurs will disappear, giving weight to the notion of pachinko as entertainment, but according to pachinko fans there are fears that this could be a repeat of the repeating types of the past, with players running out of balls faster and feeling that they are being made to pay excessively.” (“Pachinko/ Becoming Automatic/ 100 Shots in a Minute with One Hand/ In Place of a Price Hike, New Pachinko Models Recognized”, “Mainichi Shimbun”, April 5th, Showa 44.)
    So then, as for the new machines that were approved in the place of a price increase for balls-
    “There are some similarities to the old “machinegun types” that could fire hundreds of balls in the period of one minute and which were banned for being considered to stir up a speculative spirit in players, but these new machines are set so that no matter how a player tries, over 100 balls cannot be fired in a minute.”
    Until now there were no limits to how many balls a player could put in a machine, and a skilled pro pachinker could fire off 120 or 130 balls in a minute. A normal person could manage around 80 balls in a minute, and how fast one could put in and fire balls has been one of the differences between pros and general fans. With these new machines, the number of balls that can be fired in a minute has been limited to a maximum of 100 balls making pros unable to sufficiently demonstrate their skill, which is beneficial to the halls.”
    In this way the automatization of pachinko proceeded, and then rapid developments were made towards computerization.
    “The computer boom has at last entered into the world of pachinko. The retrieval of out balls, ball replenishment, and feeding of balls into the firing mechanism (repeating type) were already previously automatized, but now new machines have arrived that, using a memory apparatus that could be called a simple computer, can let one know at a glance which machines the customers are using, whether or not a player is a pro, how many balls were won or lost and even the rate balls are being awarded in the hall as a whole. These ‘cutting edge’ pachinko machines will soon be showing up in city parlors.”
    The article titled “Computers in the Pachinko Hall/ Showing up Soon/ THAT.CUSTOMER.IS.A.PRO/ Flashing Lights in the Office” from the April 22, Showa 45 issue of the “Mainichi Shimbun” continues:
    “This device was shown by the manufacturer, company H., at the 3 day New Pachinko Machine Conference held at a Ginza department store starting on the 21st. The status of the machines in a pachinko hall is sent from the device installed on the back of each machine to a ‘magic box’ in the office using a code. The top half of the box has rows of lamps with numbers corresponding to machines in the hall. A lamp lights up when the corresponding machine is in use, and flashes at a speed corresponding to the speed at which the player is firing balls. In this way the player’s firing speed becomes known, and if that speed exceeds 95 balls in one minute, the player is marked as a pro. The arrangement of the lamps is also the same as the arrangement of the machines in the hall, so it is possible to tell in which areas of the hall players gather most easily.”
    With the drawing of the curtains on Pachinko’s entry into the computer age, pachinko machines would continue to ring highly towards the “fever” of today.
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    Pachi Puro emmadog's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    the above article is interesting because it talks about skill in pachinko and that a "pro pachinker" can fire many more balls than an amateur. so it sounds like the skill lies more with how many balls per minute can be fired as opposed to placing the balls where you want them. and i'm assuming these are single shot machines so those numbers are impressive. but the odds don't change based on how fast the balls are fired. if i have a thousand balls it doesn't matter how fast i shoot them in terms of the ratio of winning to losing balls. or does it? maybe there's some physics there that i'm missing.
    personally, i never thought there was much skill involved in pachinko as compared to a pinball where good players cradle the ball, nudge, pass it from flipper to flipper, and know the angles of the ball off the flipper depending on where it hits, etc. but the lack or small amount of skill required in pachinko is also part of it's appeal. however, i do like to be challenged somewhat from these machines and that is one reason (the other being i much prefer to get paid out in a coins which also makes it easier to gauge your progress since instead of looking at a tray with hundreds of balls, you're looking at a few dozen at most coins) why i gravitated toward arrangeball machines over time in this hobby. in the vast majority of traditional vintages, all the pockets do the same thing, ie, give off the same payout so it really doesn't matter what pocket a ball goes in. there are exceptions of course such as the powerflash with different pockets doing different things and that's why it's much more fun to play imo. back to the topic of skill. in an arrangeball, you can start out a game with the goal of trying to make the completions that pay out the most which typically is the center 4 or horizontal numbers. if things don't go your way and they usually don't then you try and light certain numbers depending on where the previous balls have landed and/or try for the bonus. this makes the game more engaging to the player but also introduces more of the skill element which overall, is very small as i see it due to too many variables from all those pins, spinners, and the upper ball rebound bumper.
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  12. #28
    Stuey - The RADministrator MrGneiss's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    Wow, I've often wondered about that 100 Shots in a Minute label on some machines..

    It's interesting to hear about "pros" and rates of firing the balls..I'm guessing even if you could shoot fast you still needed to know how to read nails to find good machines back then to really have any advantage over the average player..but what do I know??

    Maybe it wasn't so much rate of fire upping the odds, but more like people that could shoot fast were just more likely to be pros..So more easily spotted..But of course if that was true that would explain nothing about why they would limit balls per minute, so nevermind!!

    Unless pros that could read nails well enough to find the loosest machines each day meant that since they could shoot so much faster on the loosest machines that they were costing parlors so much money compared to an average player even on a looser machine, that reducing balls per minute would make a difference??

    Ok, I'll stop now!!


    I wonder how that "magic box" thing worked back in 1970 to show how many shots per minute there were on a machine..
    Last edited by MrGneiss; 06-04-2012 at 06:45 AM.

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    Pachi Puro emmadog's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    those are some good points. i think you're right about pros knowing how to identify loose machines and firing the balls into the easiest scoring pockets. maybe the magic box was also used to identify unknown loose machines as well so they could be altered if necessary.
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    Eye Shooter p.opus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    I don't know about the odds, but I would say multiple balls on the field definitely ups the odds.

    For example, balls colliding with each other will definitely change the path for some balls.

    Also, if you can fire two balls quickly, you can get a rapid payout from a lotus (immediate open then close). This results in a quick turn around of 30 balls.

    I've played slow and sometimes it takes several balls to follow a lotus hit. I even had one where a center lotus hit on my last ball and I failed to hit it while with the payout from the first hit.

    I don't know. But based on my experience, I've gone through 75 balls before without a single payout. But when I shoot rapidly, it appears I rarely empty my tray without a payout.

    But it may just be an emotional thing. If I am shooting balls faster, the payouts come out quicker and I feel a machine is looser.

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  18. #31
    Blind Shooter liquid_sky's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    This is absolutely fascinating reading! Some of, if not the best historical information on Pachinko I'll ever come across.

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  20. #32
    Tokie Owens RickV's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pachinko Evolution

    Thanks for all your hard work and research. I have a Nishijin Comic Gate machine that I have been trying to date and thanks to this info I now have a good Idea of the age.

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